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How Argonaut Changed Middle School Students

Starting the school year remotely is a challenge. To help bring everyone together during the first two weeks, Middle School students set off on an adventure of self-discovery with help from Argonaut

Argonaut is a live online program that brings together small groups of middle schoolers to uncover their strengths, explore their identity, and find ways to contribute to the world. Every Middle School student engaged in daily solo challenges in the afternoons and shared their experiences and completed projects at the end of each day. 

The prompts challenged them to do activities like keeping a journal, discovering bias in their thinking, challenging a gender stereotype, and teaching a complex skill. Middle schoolers talked through their experiences and shared how they opened their minds to new ideas and learned new skills. 

Take a look at what students shared about their Argonaut experience.

“Today I chose to design and build. I made a contraption so our mail man does not have to use his hands to open our mail slot. There is some twine that connects to the ceiling, which connects to a pedal that when you push down it opens the slot. He will then put the mail in the slot and we will close the mail slit when we get the mail. Here is a link to a demonstration of my creation.” – Keys 6th Grader

“It has been a full two weeks since starting Argonaut, and it has been an amazing ride. I have made a journal, become a penpal, found awe in nature, and much more. This website has allowed me to open my mind to what I am capable of, and the challenge I am going to try and complete is “Starting a Business.” I want to sell honey in order to give the money to help honeybees flourish again because I have not seen many honeybees in 2020, and I want to change that.”   – Keys 6th Grader

“Today, I learned about an unfamiliar religion, Tenrikyo. It was founded in 1938 by Nakayama Miki. Those who are part of the religion are seen as somewhat part of the larger Shinto religion, even though they do not consider themselves to be. This religion’s main principle is that you should strive to be joyful, or have a “Joyous Life.” This is done by caring for others because they believe selfishness stops or is the opposite to joy. Another principle is to be optimistic about hardship or burden.” –Keys 8th Grader

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